FAQ

What causes spider & varicose veins?

No one knows the exact cause of spider and varicose veins, but there are several factors that cause a person to be more likely to develop them.

In women, the presence of varicose veins on the legs often signifies a more extensive health problem – pelvic congestion syndrome.
Pelvic congestion syndrome is caused by poorly functioning veins in the ovaries and pelvic region, which can manifest as varicosities in the abdomen, buttocks, vulva, and legs. Women that suffer from a generalized achiness in their pelvic area, especially when standing, lifting, or after sexual intercourse, may suffer from this condition.

Spider veins, unlike varicose veins, most often do not occur in response to increased pressure except for the pressure created by nearby varicosities themselves. They often arise from the presence of the female hormone estrogen which is most likely why these spider veins are seen more commonly in females. Women also are known to have more development of spider veins when their body estrogen levels are elevated such as when they are pregnant when taking oral contraceptives, and obviously when on estrogen replacement therapy.

What can I do to prevent vein problems?

Once you have varicose and spider veins they will not go away without medical treatment. While it is important to seek early medical attention to slow the progress of venous disease, there are conservative measures that can help alleviate the symptoms of vein:

Note: The arteries and veins generally suffer from different medical conditions and the foods we are warned to avoid that are high in fat and cholesterol do cause "hardening of the arteries" but have no effect on the leg veins.

Does walking make varicose veins worse?

No. Indeed, walking is beneficial. When you walk, the muscles in your legs contract, squeezing the veins, thus helping to force the blood to move forward on its way back to the heart. If walking causes discomfort, you should see your physician to determine why walking is causing your discomfort (i.e. to exclude any other causes besides varicose veins). Walking is also an excellent form of exercise to help promote good cardiovascular health.

Should I see a doctor about varicose veins?

Remember these important questions when deciding whether to see your doctor : Has the varicose vein become swollen, red, or very tender or warm to the touch?

If no, continue to follow the self-care tips above tissue around the treated vein.
This can cause numbness in small areas of skin, burning, or a change in sensation around the surgical scar. The most serious, but rare, complication of surgery is the creation of a deep vein blood clot that may travel to the lungs and heart.

What is economy class syndrome?

Varicose veins are often aggravated by extended period of sitting during travel. In-flight inactivity, when combined with weak vein walls, can lead to 'Economy Class Syndrome,' or the development of blood clots in the superficial venous system of the lower legs. To keep legs healthy at 30,000 feet, practice in-flight exercises like rotating your ankles while seated, walking the aisle, and standing calf raises.

Are there any complications of varicose veins? What problems can occur if left untreated?

Most people with varicose veins do not develop complications. It is impossible to predict who will develop complications. The visible size of the varicose veins is not related to whether complications will develop:
Superficial thrombophlebitis - This is the formation of a blood clot in the varicose vein. It causes redness, pain and the area is tender. It is not dangerous unless it is very extensive and approaches one of the junctions with the deep veins. This type of clot is unlikely to dislodge and move to the lungs (unlike the ones in the deep veins). I t is an uncommon occurrence.
Bleeding - If the varicose vein is covered by very thin skin, minor injuries may cause bleeding. This can be severe and may require emergency admission to hospital.

If you have varicose veins for a number of years, these conditions may arise:
Venous Eczema - this may occur over large varicose veins or around the ankle. It causes dry, red, flaky and itchy skin
Venous Pigmentation - this is brown staining of the skin around the ankle. It is due to the leakage of small amount of blood from the veins into the skin
Lipodermatosclerosis - this is the next stage up from pigmentation in that the fat under the skin is thickened and the skin feels hard and swollen. This is at high risk of breaking down to form an ulcer after minor injury
Venous Ulceration - ulcers at the ankle.
Please note that presence of a sudden area of pain and discoloration in the region of the legs, especially the calves, should be treated as an emergency as it may be indicative of deep vein thrombosis.

Do I need treatment for varicose veins?

Varicose Veins India © 2017 | All Rights Reserved

Website Designed 2 Tech Brothers

Drop in your contact details, and we will call you.

Testing

Our working hours are from
9.30 am to 6.00 pm Monday to Friday
9.30 am to 4.00 pm Saturdays